Methods of Repair

Discussion of ways foundation repair contractors do their thing…underpinning with steel, helical, drilled or push piers.

Was Your Slab Foundation Level to Begin With?

If you have your concrete slab  foundation inspected by either a repair contractor, or better yet, an independent professional structural engineer, you are likely to get an elevation report produced by one of two tools:

A  Compu Level or a manometer.  When I had my inspection done, the engineer used a Compu Level. I received a report that detailed variances in elevation from one end of my slab to the other. For example, there was a 3-4 inch drop in one corner of the house when compared to the center of the slab.

Nice to know. I suppose. But in practical terms, what does that really tell you? Unless you have a benchmark of some kind to compare the readings against, not a whole lot.  Do I have elevation readings from when the slab was newly poured? No. (more…)

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Foundation Repair Cost

So how much is it going to be, what is the cost of foundation repair? The straight answer: it depends.

Foundation repair costs vary because each situation is different.  It depends on how many piers are needed to underpin the foundation.  You may need piers all around the house or maybe just in front.  One of the worst cases is when you have a foundation that slumps in the middle.  The repair company has two choices.  Either tear up floors or go in underneath with tunnels.

The foundation repair cost can also vary by types of piers needed.  Steel, bell-bottom (or drilled) and concrete  pilings are the most common types. Helical steel piers are sometimes needed on hillsides.  There are just too many variables to be able to just throw out a figure for the foundation repair cost.

Here’s what I do know.  I live in North Central Texas and two of my neighbors have had foundation repair.  Their foundation repair costs were both about $7,000.  I was nosy enough to ask. (more…)

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Link To Foundation Inspection Report Repaired

In 2006 I had my concrete slab foundation inspected by a local structural engineer and wrote about it on this blog. I also scanned his report into a PDF file and posted it. However, in the throes of changing hosting companies the link to this report was broken and remained so for some time.  The link to the inspection report has now been fixed. My apologies for taking so long to do so.

If you’d like to see a sample of the kind of information you should get back when hiring an independent structural engineer to inspect your slab foundation you’ll find the link in this post.

You’ll need the free Adobe Acrobat Reader to view the report and you can get it here.

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Foundation Repair Job Down the Street Still Good

In 2006 I wrote about my then neighbor Dennis’ foundation repair job. The contractor used the “pressed piles” method of repair. He then sold the house to a young woman we’ll call Shelia and moved.

I was passing by last week and saw that a garage sale was going on at this same house. I figured this was a good opportunity to ask if the new owner was happy with the work done on her concrete slab. Apparently she is. “Shelia” was at work but her talkative mother was there running the garage sale.

It turns out “Shelia” had come into some money and let Dennis know she would be paying cash for the house. At that point Dennis, wanting to avoid complaints in the future, had the foundation repaired by a company that transfers a lifetime warranty to the next owner.

Mom says there has been no cracking or shifting, and “Shelia” is happy with the house. I thanked her for the information but didn’t buy anything at the sale. I have plenty of my own junk already.

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Concret Slab Foundation Gets Drilled Piers

You can tell when a guy sells the house, packs up and moves away. You can also tell when a guy just leaves. Bobby, the guy who lived behind me, has up and disappeared.

Bobby was having no luck selling his house because it needed foundation repair. He deducted the cost of fixing the slab from his asking price but didn’t realize the financing problems a new buyer would encounter. Mortgage companies are not real anxious to lend money for a house with known unresolved foundation problems. (more…)

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